Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Ever hear of "Trim Healthy Mama"?

If you are like the women I know, particularly if you are Christian, you have probably heard of this book recently. It is an all new diet book written by sisters which is the latest attempt to help mothers gain, regain, or maintain lithe figures. I paid little attention because it is often called a diet. That was until friends starting losing weight, sometimes a lot of weight (65 pounds!), on this program. That caught my eye, let me tell you. I started to pay closer attention to what they were saying. Another friend lost 25 pounds in ten weeks while keeping up her milk supply for her deliciously chubby baby. That's when I decided to look at the book. I wasn't sure what to expect.

I was worried it might be a low-fat. I was worried it might be low-carb. I was worried it might be high carb. What I found was that it was a little of all three. You see, this is a book that balances the complex needs of the body with a well balanced diet, only, it's a different balance than what we have seen before and that is what makes it worth reading. Real foodies know that saturated fats are not your enemy and are necessary for health and we are sick and tired of reading about low fat diets. We know that they rapidly deplete your mineral and vitamin stores. We have also learned to be leery of the crazy low carb ketonic diets which deplete our adrenals and unbalance our hormones. That said, it does not mean that we embrace the low protein, low fats centered on grains because they strain the liver and pancreas with climbing sugar blood levels. In the end, none are worth the temporary weight loss and the expense of our long term health. This book is not like those diets.

What this book does is embrace saturated fats like butter and coconut oil, it includes fermented raw milk foods like yogurt and kefir, extolls the benefits of lean grassfed beef, while not ignoring the importance of properly prepared grains. That sounds like a pretty darn good diet to me. In fact, it sounds a lot like the diet that I have now. The difference is that I am apparently combining my foods in all the wrong ways. This book maintains that animal protein should be the basis of each meal and complimented with either healthful traditional fats or healthful properly prepared grains but not both at the same time. In this way, you are either burning one fuel or the other. If there are healthy fats as the primary fuel of the meal, you will feel sated and your body will burn the fat as fuel. If you have carbs in the meal, your body will give you a quick source of energy (no white potatoes or flour for rapid spikes) and keep your adrenals in balance. The sisters claim that if you eat both at once, the fat is burned as fuel and the carbs are stored as fat. It is a matter of eating all foods in moderation and at the proper times. The logic makes a lot of sense with me.

Once the basic logic is applied, then the flexibility comes in. The amount of carbs can be more or less depending on your body's individual needs. Some metabolisms or states of life (pregnancy and nursing) need more carbs and this accommodates this. The personalities of the sisters themselves cover a wide spectrum of personal convictions on diet. Some of us are happy to use some processed ingredients (they use the word Frankenfoods), some of us are not; others are happy when there are occasional indulgences and others just can't be. Because the sisters do not always agree on things like this or even on the use of microwaves, this book meets a wide variety of needs. This book is right not just for people who are WAPF, Traditional Foodies but also for those who are trying to move past all those canned foods. Once you internalize the basic logic, this book is for you, no matter where you come from.

The sisters are aware that most people have been convinced that fat is the enemy and to get lean and fit they must stop eating and a large portion of the book focuses on why you need to eat fats and which ones. There are plenty of admonitions and encouragements to stop eating foods brimming with phytates. Funny enough, I felt like they were preaching to the choir! It was the discussion of low fat Greek yogurt on the more carb rich days that stopped me cold and do not get me started on egg whites. I am not even sure how to convince myself to do that! But I do eat egg whites, though not by themselves, and I might be able to get over that if I save the yolks to eat later. They also promote whey protein isolate and some of the sugar alcohols that I am not too keen on. But in the end, it is not about what they put in their carts, but what I put in mine when I go shopping. The logic can be applied differently in different cases without changing what the logic is at its core.

I think I can do this. In fact, I am planning on starting on Monday. After eleven children, I am not bouncing back like I did after my first four children. My age probably has a lot to do with it. I need to lose some weight and this seems like a great way to do it. So I am giving it a three month trial to see where this takes me. Hopefully, it is to the back of the closet where the clothes I used to wear are! Stay tuned, there will be more to come!

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12 comments:

  1. That's great!!! Please report back! ;)

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  2. I did, but I suck at planning so we ended up quitting. Hubby lost a bunch of weight right off the bat...

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    1. I am sorry I did not read it as soon as you recommended it!

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  3. Girl, you've got it! Can't wait to see how your body reacts! It all makes sense, doesn't it?

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    1. It really does! It makes so much sense.

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  4. I have heard about it. Though I still can't wrap my mind around a few things. I means eggs come in one package, and milk...if it's goats milk doesn't lend to being low fat...so how does that work. I know one of the premises is that we are in a fallen world, so things don't work as they should, but I still am having a hard time with the ideas. Are veggies a carb? I've heard for years now that you need to eat fat with your veggies to get all the vitamin benefits. Bread and butter out the door? Oh, I'm not sure if I could survive :-) Ha, ha. I have seriously wanted to look into it...when I can possibly justify that cost to my hubby, since we all have health issues in my family. GAPS helped a lot, but that was too expensive. But going off GAPS left us all back to where we started. Ugh.

    I look forward to hearing how it works for you!

    Blessings,
    Kerri

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    1. I am having a hard time with it all, too. But I was thinking that it could be that this kind of a diet is one that respects feast and famine. You eat meat when there is meat and grain when there is none. As for the veggies, it is not totally fat free when eating veggies, even on the low fat meals. The food lists separate high carb veggies and lower carb veggies so that you enjoy them at different times and always with a little fat. I have visions in my head of separating a TON off eggs at a time to make it work without resorting to cartons of egg whites. But then, we will have tons of egg yolks for other fabulous things!

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  5. I'm excited to see how it works for you. I'm interested to see how it works for someone that has good nutrition values. My husband and I eat extremely low carb right now and I feel better on it. Whenever I cheat, it takes me a couple of days to undo the bloat and general sluggish feeling. However, I do long for balance. And I want to lose weight, which isn't happening now.

    You're so awesome to let us in on this journey! I hope it works great for you.

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  6. Anonymous4/23/2014

    I read about THM on another blog recently and it seems to include the use of stevia as a sugar substitute. I have "fake sugar" issues and so haven't looked into for that reason. How do you feel about stevia?

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    1. Natural plant based stevia I have no health objections to but as for taste, I would rather lick my teenaged son's gym shoes. We use xylitol for our teeth so I am thinking about that. It is a pretty complicated issue as to how to sweeten things but in the end, it is not like a prepared diet where I MUST buy their foods.

      In the book, they advise against Splenda but want to encourage women who use it to not feel like they cannot be part of the "community". They also discuss a brother who eats more carb mixed meals than they recommend but that it works really well for him, so they leave it alone. I have a friend who uses the book who still uses honey and another (Katrina, above) who won't give up the sucanat. So, I don't think anyone is going to call me out for not using ingredients I am not comfortable using. If they do, I don't have to listen!

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  7. Awesome! Good luck! I had thought about doing it in the past but was worried that it would be a lot of junk "Franken foods" I am glad to see that you are going to tackle it as traditional foodie. Give some updates please! I may just take the plunge once I see it working for you and your lifestyle!

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